What does Vietnamese mint taste like?

Vietnamese mint looks great in the garden and tastes like a sly blend of fresh coriander, lime-leaf and green chilli. After fresh basil, Vietnamese mint (Persicaria odorata) is my favourite culinary herb.

Can I use mint instead of Vietnamese mint?

Vietnamese Mint is best used right after being picked. Slightly more sweet than regular mint but can be used as a substitute.

How often should you water Vietnamese mint?

Plant the stems out at 5 cm intervals. Cover lightly with Yates Seed Raising Mix and water well. Water regularly. Once new leaves emerge, feed weekly with Yates Thrive Vegie and Herb Liquid Plant Food.

What kind of mint do Vietnamese use?

Both peppermint and spearmint are quite common in Vietnamese cuisine. They are added to fresh rolls (gỏi cuốn) as a complimentary flavor to the pork and shrimp.

How do you keep Vietnamese mint fresh?

Place the Vietnamese mint, stems down, in a small container of water and place a plastic bag over the leaves. It can be refrigerated for up to a week. Be sure to change the water every couple of days. To dry hang small bunches upside down in a cool dark place for about two weeks then store in an airtight container.

Can you eat Vietnamese mint stems?

The bitter herb is a bit smaller, its leaves have smoother edges, and the stem is smooth. Because of its strong taste, it’s not recommendable to eat this herb raw but you can use it in a lot of soups. It’s also served alongside a traditional Vietnamese hot pot for people who want to add some bitterness in their broth.

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Do Vietnamese use cilantro?

Although cilantro is a common ingredient in Viet and other Asian dishes, people who are not familiar with the plant often mistake Vietnamese coriander and long coriander for cilantro. These three herbs are essentially different even though they are all called coriander plants.

What type of mint is used in pho?

What type of mint is used with Vietnamese pho? Spearmint is generally used with Vietnamese pho over Italian peppermints.

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