How do you store Vietnamese herbs?

Let the healthy remaining sprigs soak in water for 5 to 10 minutes so the leaves absorb water. Drain and spin in a salad spinner 2 or 3 times (dumping out water between spins) to remove excess moisture. Place in a plastic zip-top bag with a paper towel loosely wrapped around the sprigs. Refrigerate.

How do you keep Vietnamese basil fresh?

Store basil for up to 1 week in the refrigerator. Leave it in its original plastic container or rinse the leaves, roll them up in paper towels, and place them in a resealable plastic bag for up to about 4 days.

How do you store Vietnamese mint?

Place the Vietnamese mint, stems down, in a small container of water and place a plastic bag over the leaves. It can be refrigerated for up to a week. Be sure to change the water every couple of days. To dry hang small bunches upside down in a cool dark place for about two weeks then store in an airtight container.

How do you store fresh Thai basil?

Below is a way of freezing your Thai basil so you can add it to your recipes all year round:

  1. Wash and Dry. Place your Thai basil leaves in a sieve or colander and rinse well under the cold tap. …
  2. Lay Out on Greaseproof Paper. …
  3. Freeze Until Firm. …
  4. Remove and Transfer to a Bag. …
  5. Label and Return to the Freezer.
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Can I freeze fresh basil?

ANSWER: Yes, you can freeze fresh basil leaves, but they just need a little help. Basil is a particularly delicate herb because it hates the cold and darkens when cut. Keep in mind any fresh herbs that you freeze will not be entirely the same as fresh. Freezing will change the texture and it won’t be as stable.

What can I do with extra Vietnamese mint?

You could also freeze the leaves for a rainy day or dry them out. For the former, remove the leaves from the stem and lay on baking trays in the freezer. Once frozen, pack loosely into freezer bags making sure you don’t crush them too much but do expel as much air as you can.

Do Vietnamese use cilantro?

Coriander (Cilantro) – Rau Mùi or Ngò



And if you’re from North America you probably call it “cilantro”. Coriander is very prevalent in Vietnamese cuisine particularly on banh mi (bánh mì) sandwiches, sprinkled on top of pho (phở), and mixed in with many fresh salads.

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