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ProjekBrunei.com - Everyone has a Story

Written by Delwin Keasberry Thursday, 26 June 2014 23:57

Ibrahim

Usually I start of these pieces with a thought or two as a segue into the how I met or heard about the person I am featuring. With Ibrahim, let me get to the point. I think he's a funny guy. The quicker we get to the content, the quicker you'll see why.

For more of Ibrahim, check out his YouTube channel.

What do you do?

Basically I make YouTube videos to entertain people. I have more viewers from Brunei so I make more Brunei-relatable videos...but I'm planning to do more worldwide-relatable videos.

Describe yourself.

I would describe myself as a creative person. I express my feelings and hatred through making videos that are actually offensive - yet that's what makes my audience happier and laugh more.

What does 'funny' mean to you?

Funny to me means not caring what people think about one another, and if it's funny to me then it's funny. HAHA! Did that make any sense? Basically I will laugh to anything when the joke or person isn't trying so hard to be funny and they don't have to plan it out...which I do so I don't find myself exactly that funny but other people do, which makes me so happy!

Are you a funny guy? Share about your beginnings.

Honestly, I am not the funniest guy out there and there are way funnier people - but as a Bruneian, I think I would consider myself funny because they don't have a lot of funny people to entertain us so yeah.

I started making funny videos in middle school and uploaded them on Facebook, but soon kids around me had YouTube channels too. So I created a channel, uploaded random parodies and music videos; I only had 100-200 views and got 4-5 likes in a year. Recently, for my latest video, I think I am already hitting 400-500 likes in TWO DAYS!!!!! But I'll be honest, I started making more funny videos after my How To: Indo Drama post. I never expected to go this far....

Does your audience 'get it'?

Yes, a lot of people get it and can relate to my videos. For example, my latest video has 400-500 likes but only 20 dislikes. As always, there will be a group of Bruneians who don't get the term "joke" and "over-exaggeration". Yes, I get haters but it makes me happier because it makes me stronger and more confident. Plus, those haters don't even make videos that can entertain an audience worldwide.

Describe your brainstorming process.

Well, normally all my videos are based on true events that have happened to me. If I realize it, I write it down on while in class or jot it down in my phone. I then type it up on my laptop and expand from there. I pick my main points which turn into skits / scenes, then the most important part is editing the video which makes it way funnier. I'll be honest with you, if my editing was really bad and not "YouTube famous-like", I think I wouldn't be that funny ahah :)

Where do you see yourself in one to three years?

In school, I will be taking my A-Levels; DT, Media and Art. Hopefully, other than school, I will have a larger fan base (which is already increasing - two Twitter fan accounts, two Instagram fan pages, I receive a lot of fan art, I get really sweet feedback and comments on Instagram and ask.fm). Of course there is hate, but surprisingly a small amount though, but because of them, I hope this might help me in University. I really really really want to go to LA, USA or Singapore. I don't know, I mean I live in Brunei so it would be very tough, but I will do whatever it takes to be big like Cameron Dallas or NigaHiga!

Ibrahim3

everyone

 
Wednesday, 26 March 2014 22:48

HazirahHazirah Marzuke co-founded both Open Brunei (openbrunei.org) and B:Read (https://www.facebook.com/breadbn), communities which serve the Bruneian population in different ways. I speak to Hazirah here about the creation of Open Brunei, what it’s like to collaborate online and off, and the separation of public and private spaces.

Hazirah is a graduate of the University of Warwick, and worked in e-government in Brunei for five years before beginning an MA in Digital Sociology at Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2013.

Before Open Brunei and B:Read, there was…

My history on the Internet: I created my first website on GeoCities in 1998, and yes, I am responsible for my father's Internet bill that same year. I ran a fan website for a popular game for a few years, and had a blog which was off the Simpur Blogging Nation radar and quite unremarkable. Many years of my Internet life were spent as a fangirl and making websites. Now I'm just a lurker on Reddit, I occasionally tweet and blog, and I run Open Brunei and B:Read with my friends.

Early Websites

The Open Brunei origins story.

Open Brunei came about when Faiq Airudin and I came up with the idea of an MRT or London Underground type of map, but using Brunei locations. We called this the Brunei-Muara Metro Service. It seemed like something different from what we usually posted on our own websites; his was photography, and mine was a blog. Faiq was already in discussion with Hazwan Jaya about writing about art and culture from a Brunei perspective. So we thought about creating a new website on art and culture and other subjects that we were personally interested in. I wanted to make infographics and spreadsheets, things to do with data, and also share Brunei-related stuff I digged up on my online travels. Seriously, this is the story.

But after posting our Brunei-Muara metro map and write-up, we reached almost 1000 views in a week. For a handful of posts on a new website, I hadn't really expected more than one or two hundred views. There was a modest amount of comments, including on Facebook, and a lot of shares. I really liked the idea of provoking people’s thoughts, and of people discussing things contemplatively and critically.

So with Open Brunei, we aim to generate interesting discussions but also maintain a level of quality in terms of clarity and openness. I hope this has been demonstrated so far!

What has been the most interesting thing to come out of running Open Brunei, personally?

I can think of this in two ways. I was personally surprised to see my own role emerge as an editor and, to a lesser extent, as a writer. I always think it’s great when we try new things and discover more about ourselves.

It’s also been very interesting to see people’s responses, when they comment and share. I am generalizing, but I might surmise from the responses that people are interested in thoughtful content about arts, culture and - for some reason - transport. For the metro post, I liked some of the critical comments that were posted on Facebook - one pointed out that Jalan Menteri Besar, the same road where the Immigration Department and several Ministries are located, should be serviced by more than one line. Another pointed out that Brunei is still covered by forest, hence a metro service could not be built in a big circle. There were a number of good comments for Tourists for a Day as well.

Brunei Metro Service

You are also one of the co-founders of B:Read! Both Open Brunei and B:Read seem to me to be very community-spirited. Tell me about this.

I have never really thought of that, but yes, I suppose you could call me somewhat community-minded, in the sense that I believe in community-created things like wikis.

With B:Read, we tell people that they can initiate their own gatherings or even book-swapping events. The first bookswap we participated in wasn’t even initiated by us, but by a member of the group (then called “Brunei Bookswap”) on Facebook. I have heard of other swaps happening in Brunei and am pleased to hear it. You can view this cynically and see us as selfish; maybe the B:Read committee want to lessen the burden of doing things ourselves because the community is doing them instead. But I also think it’s a matter of not wanting to control everything that has to do with the reading culture in Brunei - why should we claim that mission as ours and only ours?

I also like to see a range of perspectives and discussions that are open and tolerant, so in another sense I’m interested in different subgroups within communities. B:Read has been great for meeting people outside of my social circles - teenagers who don’t have their own money to buy books, teachers from other districts, business owners - who all have a perspective on reading and books.

I think Open Brunei is less diverse in its scope, because our posts are exclusively in English and perhaps colored by our overseas-educated backgrounds. I’d like to see more variety of thought, including intersections where people with knowledge or experience can fill in the gaps made by the Open Brunei team and our contributors.

Another relationship between the two, I think, is that the teams for both B:Read and Open Brunei aren’t especially interested in making money, and that drives some of our decisions, such as seeking sponsorship (or not), our approaches to promotion and who we work with and whether we will ever make B:Read t-shirts. I guess we share similar ideals of the free culture ideologies, hence swapping books instead of selling them.

On using online communities to foster offline communities.

For Open Brunei, I can’t say there is any offline community activity at the moment. The “Tourists for a Day” public transport experiment was conceived by my friends, so I can’t take credit on that point.

But for B:Read, we are definitely conscious of supplementing the online community with offline activities. I initially saw the Facebook group only as an online community for swapping books, but talking to other co-founders, Teah Abdullah, Mohamed Nazmi, and Faiq, our ideas for B:Read as a way to encourage reading culture were rooted in the physical. Partly I think it is to do with the physicality of books - gathering books for book donations, for example - and also acknowledging different ways in which to encourage reading in the wider public - doing book readings (reading out loud from a book to an audience), having public events. We also think that meeting other readers is important. Who else but a fellow reader to engage in discussion about books, or to recommend or receive recommendations about books, and in effect keep your reading habit going?

I have a love for the online world, so I definitely still believe it’s a good way to pursue any specific or niche interests you have - as a teenager, I frequented Harry Potter forums discussing more in-depth aspects of the series - whether “good” and “bad” are really so black-and-white in the series, theories about understated moments in the books, and even critiques of whether JK Rowling’s writing was actually good. But I know quite a few Potterheads in real life now, and I think these are things I can discuss with them. There is a joy meeting other people who read, and who are also from the same culture or country as you - people you can relate to because they also grew up with the idiosyncrasies of Bruneian society.

I think this will play out with any hobby or interest, really - the power of the Internet to find other like-minded people online, and to offer them the option to meet in real life, and use these online and offline spaces to share their world with one another.

BREAD

 
Written by Delwin Keasberry Wednesday, 19 March 2014 17:10

liyanayusprof Hello World. Get ready for Yasmine, the first feature film from Brunei. The official release will be in August 2014 but already it has gained the attention of the film world and many from the international media including the Monocle and The Guardian.

The team behind the movie shared, "Yasmine is a beautifully choreographed story that inspires us to revisit our dreams. Action, comedy and drama come together powerfully in this unforgettable journey."

Yasmine will be introduced to the international film industry at the Hong Kong International Film Festival (March 24 to April 7) and at the Cannes Film Festival in May this year. Find out more via the Yasmine website.

Let's get to know Liyana Yus who plays the lead role of Yasmine.

What do you do?
I’m an actress.

Describe yourself in a few words.
Hyper, musically influenced, has a passion for sports and loves chocolate!

You play a key role in Yasmine - Brunei's first feature film. Share with us some highlights from that experience.
Getting told that I got the role of Yasmine, working with massive talents during the production, and all the training I had to go through for acting as well as the action sequences.

Are you naturally 'dramatic'? Or was there a steep learning curve in preparing for your role in Yasmine?
I had help from the best individuals in their respective fields, so it was a great advantage to my learning process. Of course being new to all this, there was a bit of a struggle in making sure the director was satisfied with the takes. I was constantly learning as I was shooting for the film.

Describe a typical day on the Yasmine set. Super glamorous? Or super hard work?
It was definitely super super hard work, since this is our first film. And since it's an action movie as well, the preparation in getting into character and making the action sequences look so natural was intense and incredibly challenging.

What are your thoughts about Brunei's creative scene.
I think Brunei has great talents. It's just not so often that people get an opportunities to share it. We lack the proper exposure and platforms, but we can start with supporting each other to develop a productive and healthy artistic scene.

Who are some key people you would like to thank or acknowledge?
I would like to thank my family, my manager and director Siti Kamaluddin and the Origin Films family, my friends for supporting me and keeping me motivated. And of course the most important, all of my fans for the never ending support even though they haven’t seen Yasmine yet but they are still patiently waiting for it.

What's next for you?
Next would be promoting Yasmine as it’s coming out this year. I also just shot a short film for International Women’s Day in Malaysia, part of the Ikal Mayang and WOMEN:girls Initiative, called Mentari which was written and directed by Siti Kamaluddin. It's part of an anthology of six films, comprising of female directors from Brunei, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand.

yasmine1

 
Written by Delwin Keasberry Wednesday, 12 March 2014 17:30

FayenProfThere is a saying that goes, "Variety is the spice of life." I like that saying. It is more than sentiment. I have found it to be true. The more I take the road less traveled, the more people I meet, the more I broaden my music intake, the further out of my comfort zone I step, the fuller my life becomes. Of course, colour and adventure do not come around every day, but this should not stop us from looking for them.

I was looking around, and I came across @Fayen's journey on Instagram. I cannot recall when exactly, but one day I noticed she posted up a picture of a typewriter. And then of a tlr camera. And then of a bunch of other really vintage-y photographs. I made it a point to connect, and she agreed to share her story. Check out her other photographs here.

Who are you?
A girl who believes that everyone has their own story and their own little ways in shaping their lives. As for me, I graduated from UBD last year with my first degree in something I did not expect to major in, which was English Language & Linguistics and have since been trying to get myself a job. Apart from that, I always feel like I am this 23 year old with a very old soul and always so sure that I might be having some kind of quarter-life crisis, however, that’s not necessarily a bad phase.

Describe yourself.

mary and max2

This is Max Jerry Horrowitz, a character from an Australian clay-animated film called Mary and Max. I know this may be an unfamiliar movie to you, but this is one of the most beautiful movies I've ever seen in my life. It is basically "a tale of friendship between two unlikely pen pals: Mary, a lonely, eight-year old girl living in the suburbs of Melbourne, and Max, a fourty-four year old, severely obese man living in New York" (IMDB). 

An old friend once described me as, "a girl whose spirit is stuck in the vintage zone, who takes pictures and uses a typewriter. She writes letter too." I see myself somewhere in between Mary and Max, a girl whom without reasons would just randomly sends letter to people (like Mary) and then always feeling anxious about (mostly unnecessary) things (like Max).

What get's you going?
Meet my little family.

fayencams

I don't exactly remember when was the first time I held a camera and took my first picture but I've always been drawn to them, especially Analog Cameras.

When I was 12, my family and our relatives went to visit Mt. Kinabalu. My parents were so kind to let me hold the camera at that time, it was a Canon Automatic Point & Shoot camera, and everything about the place was so beautiful and there was this really bright yellow flower that really caught my attention so I took a picture of it. When we finally developed the film, and printed out the pictures -  it was the only one that made me realised how much fun capturing moments can be.

Would you say you've pursued photography ever since?
According to my parents, pursuing Arts at that time was not exactly an ideal approach. As parents, they ought to seek for the best in their kids so they were hoping I'd choose something that would benefit me in the future, career wise of course. However, I was stubborn and tried to convince them day to day on why I made my choices on wanting to study Photography, alongside Design & Technology until eventually my father gave in and bought me my first Analog SLR camera, which was a Nikon F801-S (I call her Casandra). It's semi-automatic, has both auto and manual focus, fairly modern and pleasant to work with.

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Your thoughts on Analog vs Digital photography?
I took Photography for my A-Levels and I spent so many hours being in the darkroom; it's located at the basement of my school, since it's a darkroom, it's always dark and cold. Nothing about it is quiet though since you can always hear water passing through the pipelines. To me, there is something beautiful about taking a picture and then processing the film with your own hands. I am glad that I’ve been given the opportunity to learn on how to do so because most camera shops and photo studios in Brunei are no longer using these manual methods to process their films, which is a bit frustrating.

So in my final year of A’level, everyone in my class seemed to slowly move away from the analog phase and jumped into digital photography. I didn't want to be left behind, so I saved up some money and bought my first DSLR. It was a second-hand Canon EOS 350D (I named this one Fayera). The first two or three thousand shots were meaningless for me but with a digital camera, there was plenty of room for improvements. Also, with the power of editing, a digital image can be so easily manipulated and you can even turn a bad picture to a good one.

 
Tuesday, 04 March 2014 11:56

FoundersofHMDk Hanisah Lia Pg Hj Mohd Salleh, 30, or Ness as she’s usually known (“I got this name when I was studying in Australia. Ozzies couldn’t pronounce “Hanisah,” so Ness it was!”) is a Human Biology graduate from the University of Southern Queensland, Australia, and the co-founder of HayaaMusfirah (http://www.hayaamusfirah.com), local online retailer of clothing for Muslim women.

On a background in business.

I have no background in business except I think it is in my blood. My maternal late grandfather had a mini mart back in the day and my mom had a tailoring business as well. I didn’t have any interest then in “inheriting” my mother’s business and after I got married, my husband said he didn’t want me to work, but he did influence me to dip my feet in the business world so I decided to take up business just to fill in the time.

So! How was HayaaMusfirah born?

It was the brain child of Nabilah Taif and myself. A few years ago before we started in 2010, it was really difficult to find syariah-compliant hijabs (Syariah compliant here meaning to cover the chest as well as hair) - we had to order our hijabs from overseas. So we came together and pooled our money and started the business in April 2010. We both decided on the name as well. Hayaa’ means modest / modesty and Musfirah means elegant in Arabic. Our motto was you can still look elegant while covering up and maintaining your modesty.

In the last 5-7 years there's been a huge upswing of interest regionally (and globally!) in both Muslimah-friendly fashion, and the digital market. Where do you think HayaaMusfirah fits into this scene?

In comparison, I personally think that HayaaMusfirah’s standards are not similar to most local Muslimah businesses but maybe have more in common with a few regional businesses. My personal opinion on the “Muslimah Friendly” fashion trend is that most are not quite syariah-compliant. There are only a few global companies that I am aware of that sell syariah-compliant clothing (i.e. loose clothing, hijabs covering the chest, etc). Two of them are Shukr (http://www.shukr.co.uk) (UK-based, I think) and Indonesian brand Kivitz (http://kivitz.blogspot.co.uk) (OK, I’m biased. I love Kivitz!!!). Most regional Muslimah companies sell a mixed clothing line, of syariah-compliant and not-so-syariah-compliant clothing, unlike Shukr and Kivitz.

HijabNess

HMArmSocks

HMPhotoshoot

HayaaMusfirah's particular niche of the market is focused on syariah-compliance. Can you tell me a bit about how HayaaMusfirah has interpreted this compliance? How important is this to you, and has there ever been a point when you've been tempted to expand or bend what this compliance means?

Before we started we did extensive reading on how to make sure the business does not deviate from the teachings of the Quran and Hadith. We did some research on the attire of a Muslimah, the dos and donts, what is admissible and what isn’t. While there are differences in opinion by different scholars on the attire of the Muslimah, we decided to take the middle stand which is to follow the modern trend but if it goes to a point that the trend goes against the ruling we hold on to, then we will not continue that line.

Yes, many times we’ve been tempted to “bend the rules” and we did a few times but every time we did, we found that we would make fewer sales than usual. Even when the clothing line was in demand in other Muslimah businesses, it wouldn’t sell as well with us.

Strange but true. I suppose it turns off our customers because what appeals to them, I think, is the uniqueness of the business, how we focus mainly on syariah-compliant hijabs and attire. But once we deviate from that, we lose our appeal and become “normal”. I think. Hehe.

 

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You, You and You

Something interesting to share with the rest of the world about Brunei? Interested in being featured on ProjekBrunei.com? Reach me here.